Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Inventing Our Selves

When I'm asked what my art's about – which is every time I'm interviewed or talking to patrons at one of my openings – I talk about how a contemporary woman's identity (including her sexuality) is defined by advertising, entertainment, and commercial pornography.
My take on it is dystopic: we surrender ourselves to cookie-cutter personae concocted by producers, programmers and marketers and blithely follow the scripts they pen for us. We become actors in a curious reality show they direct in our heads. It makes us more amenable to a relentless, ambient commercial feed. We become more malleable as consumers.
I'm no different – which is why fictive, media-inspired versions of me turn up in nearly all my work. My recent big enamel paintings are produced in series (just like TV shows and ad campaigns) because I'm trying to replicate the experience of mass media.
Let's face it, it's getting
hard to tell art (and artist) from product – something both Andy Warhol and Damien Hirst understood.

3 comments:

d.edlen said...

I think the trick is to be aware of the source of that feed. All is choice, we aren't passive.

If anything, the ability to directly reach the creatives should make it more realistic, more personal, more "authentic". It's the choice of the artist to focus the looking glass on what aspect of themself they want to develop their public persona and brand.

As is does, and take control of that which you have control of.

Peace.

Nick said...

This is not really related to this particular post but, I noticed today for the first time that I had to click through a warning screen to get to this post. Has this always been the case? Did Blogger/Google suddenly decide that you have objectionable content today? What is up with that?

h. colditz said...

hazel,
why would you want to replicate yourself or "buy into media"? not sure what statement you are trying to make outside of pretty girls, great bods, awesome colors/graphics!
not saying, just saying...i like your work but is there really a deeper message? pardon the pun.
hazel in AZ
ps. where's my T shirt?