Thursday, October 15, 2009

Mind(Less)

"I don't think about art while I work. I try to think about life."
- Jean-Michel Basquiat
I control my emotions when I paint with enamel. When I paint with watercolours or draw in ink, I let them all out.
I don't think about technique, composition or colour. I try not to think at all. Instead, I probe the tender areas within myself to reach feelings I've suppressed. I revisit emotional experiences – heartache, love, death, happiness, obsessions, dreams, nightmares – and with them, memories that once I might have tried to erase. There are also images that have seeped into my subconscious from elsewhere: fragments from other people's paintings or photographs, scenes from movies, TV documentaries or music videos, incidents glimpsed through the windscreen of my car, descriptions I've read in poetry or a novel, or lurid fantasies that exist only in my head.
The result isn't random or a matter of luck. Somewhere between my imagination and a blank sheet of paper, the coagulated spill of feelings and visions acquires coherency, revealing some underlying intention. For better or worse, it becomes art.

6 comments:

fish said...

I have only recently come across your work and it's stunning. I am struck by your writings as well. In particular, this post resonated with me. Often times I try to discuss art coming out of subconscious flow but I'm met with blank stares. Here's a link of my attempt to capture it in writing. Although the backdrop of this is a dream, I experience subconscious flow in a similar manner. http://twitpic.com/lqb0r I see truth everywhere in your writing and art...that is the true test of greatness.

G Grubbs said...

I'm in the same boat as fish- I've only seen your work the past couple of days, have gone through your website (which is very well done) and agree that the full body of work is very powerful; writings, drawings, paintings, etc.

I'm convinced - you are a great artist.

Frank Marcopolos said...

"Somewhere between my imagination and a blank sheet of paper, the coagulated spill of feelings and visions acquires coherency, revealing some underlying intention. For better or worse, it becomes art."

This is truth-infused beautiful. I experience the same thing, on my best days, when I write. And on my worst days, I experience the exact opposite. Which is not pleasant.

Aminah K. said...

That was lovely! When most people describe art they tend to throw up a bunch of superlatives that leads to nowhere. When I read your post, each line struck me like a speeding bullet. You have a gift and I can tell that you truly meant that. I don't mean to come off touchy, but to me the best form of writing is the kind that comes from the heart.

faunawolf said...

And perhaps this is why so many great artists and writers have been considered 'mad'.

mondotrasho said...

This this is why, at least for me, your watercolours affect me more than your larger works even though they have a shared gestural technique. I haven't been in the same room with one of the big paintings -- yet. Toronto 2010 still a go then?