Friday, September 10, 2010

Instant Gratification

I have always used photography to work out the gestures and expressions of figures in the rigorously composed spaces of my enamel paintings. I used to prefer the instantaneity of small, amateur Polaroid SX-70 and 600 prints, which allowed me to review numerous 'hard copy' images as I refined a pose without having to resort to a computer or worse, a photo lab. Over the years, I amassed hundreds, in monochrome and colour. I discarded them carelessly in a large plastic plastic garbage bag in a cupboard along with paints, solvents and brushes.
I thought nothing of these prints until four years ago, when a friend of mine, a photographer, came across the stash. Under my bemused (and slightly embarrassed) gaze, he dumped the filled-to-bursting bag onto the timber floor of my beachside studio, squatted amid a spill of small, 8cm x 8cm images and began to 'curate' a series of the more interesting pictures. I exhibited a handful of them at my first-ever exhibition of watercolours, Venus In Hell, at MARS Gallery in Melbourne, in 2006. Over the next year, several groupings were sold to collectors.
Two dozen Polaroid 600 prints, each signed and dated, are now being re-sold by one of those collectors. All are mounted in double-ply, archival quality white rag and some are also framed within a custom-designed perspex box (29cm x 26cm x 3cm).
Unusual and 'one-off', unlike other forms of photographic print, some of these images are more than ten years old. A testament to the stability of Polaroid's instant emulsions, they are virtually unchanged in colour since the day they were ejected from the front of the cheap plastic camera I bought in a local thrift store.They represent an unusual glimpse of the process through which I conceived and refined some of my better known early paintings – as well as of the woman I was then.
Better yet, they are available at about three per cent of the price for which the paintings derived from them are now sold at auction.
The following is an abbreviated catalogue of the images offered. The colors might be slightly different from those displayed here and dimensions of the mattes and/or frames are not noted. However, if you're interested, please contact my studio and I'll put you in touch with the seller.
Pola' Auto-Erotica Color, 2000, a set of four Polaroid 600 self-processing prints, each approx. 7.8cm x 7.7cm, individually mounted in white archival rag. $A2,400 for the set, plus delivery ($A3,200 individually framed in perspex, plus delivery).
Too Much, Never Enough, 2001, a set of four Polaroid 600 self-processing prints, each approx. 7.8cm x 7.7cm, individually mounted in white archival rag. $A2,000 for the set, plus delivery ($A2,800 individually framed in perspex, plus delivery).
Pink Bits, 2001, a set of two Polaroid 600 self-processing prints, each approx. 7.8cm x 7.7cm, individually mounted in white archival rag. $A750 for the pair, plus delivery.
Cunning Stunts, 2001, a set of two Polaroid 600 self-processing prints, each approx. 7.8cm x 7.7cm, individually mounted in white archival rag. $750 for the pair, plus delivery.
Dexedrine Nights, 2001, a set of two Polaroid 600 self-processing prints, each approx. 7.8cm x 7.7cm, individually mounted in white archival rag. $A900 for the pair, plus delivery.

1 comment:

shāna said...

hazel - really like the series, "Too Much, Never Enough". love seeing the inspiration behind the inspiration, so to speak. wish i was in a place to purchase. all the best.